Personal 1-to-1 coaching will be the most important and influential activity in a young athlete’s development and confidence. Great things happen when a young player is given the opportunity to have 1-to-1 time with an expert.  Contrary to popular opinion, it is not how much time you practice, but rather ‘how you practice’, that makes the difference.  Skilled, high level training from an expert combined with a desire to learn on behalf of the player,

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Running Back

The running back is the guy who is typically lined up in the offensive backfield with the quarterback. The primary roles of a running back are to receive handoffs from the quarterback for a rushing play, to catch passes from out of the backfield, and to block. A great running back must be tough, durable, elusive, strong, and an effective blocker.  He possesses great vision as well as the ability to make the first tackler miss or can break that first tackle. 

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Prior to his senior season at The University of San Diego Sebastian was selected as one of only 20 pre-season Walter Payton Award candidates, which is the equivalent of the Heisman Trophy for the nation’s top FCS (Football Championship Series) athlete.

He was rated by many NFL scouting services in the top 24 quarterbacks in the nation.  He was a prototypical NFL style QB at 6’3″ and 223 pounds and ran the West Coast Offense at USD. 

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The position of receiver requires a player to posses the greatest combination of athletic skills of any other position. Agility, hand-eye coordination, balance, precision of movement, deception, explosiveness, the ability to concentrate under duress, and toughness define a great receiver. “The ability to catch the ball within the heart of the secondary is like someone tossing you a T-bone steak inside a cage of hungry lions! First you’ve got to catch that steak and then you’ve got to get out of there without getting eaten!”- Coach Van Tassel

Now that I’ve painted a picture for you let’s look at just one of the things you’ll need to master as a receiver and that is line releases.

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The position of kicker is a unique position. Not only does a kicker need to be athletic and coordinated to kick the ball physically but he must posses the confidence to handle pressure. Flexibility, strength, technique and mental toughness are all important attributes of a great kicker.

“I can tell you, I have seen too many kickers that can kick the ball a long way, but doing it under pressure is another story.

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Bill Cunerty has worked with numerous NFL athletes, and most recently Andrew Luck the #1 NFL Draft pick in 2012. He is considered to be one of the nations top quarterback coaches. Bill teaches performance training for elite athletes. He is often called upon to help recent college seniors achieve their dreams of playing in the National Football League. The 20-somethings come to coach Cunerty from all over the country for the opportunity to work with him.

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Receiver

The position of receiver requires a player to posses the greatest combination of athletic skills of any other position. Agility, hand-eye coordination, balance, precision of movement, deception, explosiveness, the ability to concentrate under duress, and toughness define a great receiver. “The ability to catch the ball within the heart of the secondary is like someone tossing you a T-bone steak inside a cage of hungry lions!  First you’ve got to catch that steak and then you’ve got to get out of there without getting eaten!”

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Coach Eric Van Tassel is considered one the most complete receiver coaches in the country. He was raised in Denver, CO. He grew up closely tied to professional football as he was the neighbor of former Denver Broncos Defensive Coordinator Joel Collier and was childhood friends with his son Joel Collier Jr. Van Tassel graduated from Fort Lewis College in Durango, CO with a degree in Exercise Science in 1987. While at Fort Lewis he played wide receiver and still holds the record for the most two point receptions in a career and season.

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Your Recruiting Process

Most high school football players are unfamiliar with the college recruiting process when they first start receiving interest from various colleges. As a former college coach, I feel it is important for kids and parents to understand how the recruiting process works from the perspective of the coach.

Legally, college coaches can only send freshman or sophomore football players two documents, a questionnaire and a camp brochure. The NCAA prohibits anything else be sent prior to September 1st of a prospective player’s junior year.

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Special Teams is a game-changer in youth football.  Most youth football teams do not practice Special Teams the needed amount of time, and they pay the consequences in the game and ultimately in their win/loss record.   Also, most youth teams place a high number of minimum play players on their Special Team units.  This will lead to bad news.

A typical pee-wee team should spend at least one/seventh of it’s weekly practice time on coordinated Special Teams practice. 

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